Suburban English Magick

MENTAL SPAGHETTI & COLLECTIVE//POD PRESENT

MARIE-LOUISE PLUM: ‘SUBURBAN ENGLISH MAGICK’

02.09 – 16.09 2017


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Behind every brutal scene/there is beauty/in Suburban English Magick: Peer in to the world of semi-rural village life in the Shires. Modern day folklore, witchcraft and the uncanny, dressed in sportswear, driven in souped-up race cars, depicted in paint and recited in tongue.”

From 2-16 September, a picture of Suburban English Magick will be built up, in paint and tongue, in Bob and Roberta Smith’s CCCA Shed, Coventry.

Custodians of the CCCA, Collective//Pod, have programmed this live painting exhibition as the run-up to the Scratch the Surface Festival, 2017, co-curated and programmed with various partners, including Mental Spaghetti.

Marie-Louise Plum is painting the entire interior of the shed, improvising contemporary folkloric vignettes inspired by a spoken word and cut-up sound composition.

Please note that live painting and audio installation will only take place between 10am-6pm, Fridays and Saturdays, and, 10am – 4pm, Sundays, from 2-16 September.

The installation is visible at all times during Fargo Village opening hours.

VENUE CCCA Shed, FARGO Village, Far Gosford Street, Coventry, CV1 5ED

DATES Exhibition runs 2-16 September, 2017

OPENING HOURS Monday – Saturday 10:00 – 18:00, Sunday 11:00- 16:00

GETTING THERE 20 minutes walk from Coventry train station MAP

FREE ENTRY

WWW.MARIELOUISEPLUM.COM

Suburban English Magick A3 Poster for print

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Birthday Letters, Illustrated

Along with approximately 250 thousand other firm intentions and ideas, a promise to illustrate all the female characters from Ted Hughes prose poem, Gaudete, using clothes-off life models only, to exhibit at the Ted Hughes Festival, alongside a ballet performance, has toppled into the ‘Haven’t Done It Because Life’ chamber.

In the ‘Putting Off Because Insecurity and Need for Reassurance’ corner, my paid-for commissions and responsibilities languish, while I distract myself with another Ted Hughes side project, using the excuse of potentially career-furthering, future book illustration employment as reason.

I’ve started illustrating poems from Birthday Letters, Hughes’s parting salvo – released a few months before his death in 1998, after 35 years of silence on the subject – a softener and/or fan flamer to the ‘Ted or Sylvia?’ lead teamsters, lifting the rocks from his chest.

About Sylvia, about Ted, of Sylvia, of Ted, addressed to Sylvia, from Ted.

Here are the first two illustrations, more will follow, sporadically, no doubt. The poems, below each image.

Black Coat

I remember going out there,
The tide far out, the North Shore ice-wind
Cutting me back
To the quick of the blood – that outer-edge nostalgia,
The good feeling. My sole memory
Of my black overcoat. Padding the wet sandspit.
I was staring at the sea, I suppose.
Trying to feel thoroughly alone,
Simply myself, with sharp edges –
Me and the sea one big tubula rasa,
As if my returning footprints
Out of that scrim of gleam, that horizon-wide wipe,
Might be a whole new start.

My shoe-sole shapes
My only sign.
My minimal but satisfying discussion
With the sea.
Putting my remarks down, for the thin tongue
Of the sea to interpret. Inaudibly.
A therapy,
Instructions too complicated for me
A the moment, but stowed in my black box for later.
Like feeding a wild deer
With potato crisps
As you do in that snapshot where you exclaim
Back towards me and my camera.

So I had no idea I had stepped
Into the telescopic sights
Of the paparazzo sniper
Nested in your brown iris.
Perhaps you had no idea either,
So far off, half a mile maybe,
Looking towards me. Watching me
Pin the sea’s edge down.
No idea
How that double image,
Your eye’s inbuilt double exposure
Which was the projection
Of your two-way heart’s diplopic error,
The body of the ghost and me the blurred see-through
Came into single focus,
Sharp-edged, stark as a target,
Set up like a decoy
Against that freezing sea
From which your dead father had just crawled.

I did not feel
How, as your lenses tightened,
He slid into me.

© Ted Hughes. All Rights Reserved.

Red

Red was your colour.
If not red, then white. But red
Was what you wrapped around you.
Blood-red. Was it blood?
Was it red-ochre, for warming the dead?
Haematite to make immortal
The precious heirloom bones, the family bones.

When you had your way finally
Our room was red. A judgement chamber.
Shut casket for gems. The carpet of blood
Patterned with darkenings, congealments.
The curtains — ruby corduroy blood,
Sheer blood-falls from ceiling to floor.
The cushions the same. The same
Raw carmine along the window-seat.
A throbbing cell. Aztec altar — temple.

Only the bookshelves escaped into whiteness.

And outside the window
Poppies thin and wrinkle-frail
As the skin on blood,
Salvias, that your father named you after,
Like blood lobbing from the gash,
And roses, the heart’s last gouts,
Catastrophic, arterial, doomed.

Your velvet long full skirt, a swathe of blood,
A lavish burgandy.
Your lips a dipped, deep crimson.

You revelled in red.
I felt it raw — like crisp gauze edges
Of a stiffening wound. I could touch
The open vein in it, the crusted gleam.

Everything you painted you painted white
Then splashed it with roses, defeated it,
Leaned over it, dripping roses,
Weeping roses, and more roses,
Then sometimes, among them, a little blue
bird.

Blue was better for you. Blue was wings.
Kingfisher blue silks from San Francisco
Folded your pregnancy
In crucible caresses.
Blue was your kindly spirit — not a ghoul
But electrified, a guardian, thoughtful.

In the pit of red
You hid from the bone-clinic whiteness.

But the jewel you lost was blue.

© Ted Hughes. All Rights Reserved.

Open call for artists, Mail Art: E17.



Mail art work by György Galántai, 1981

This is an open call for mail art from around the UK and the world.

Mail Art: E17 is the first stop on a moving exhibition of mail art from artists and illustrators across the globe, housed on this leg at Walthamstow Wine Club in Walthamstow, E17, London. I am curating the exhibition in E17* and looking for curators for future exhibitions.

I am seeking art on any subject and in any form with the one stipulation that the art relates to a mailable or mailed form. For example, that could be art on jiffy bags, envelopes, brown paper, packages, art using stamps, printed or franked labels, mail stickers, stencils or mail delivery cards. You can draw, paint, cut, stick and glue, cut-out, construct, scribble or print. Anything goes.

If you would like to take part in the exhibition please email me at mail[at]marielouiseplum.com or send your work directly the Mail Art:E17, c/o Walthamstow Wine, 56-60 Grove Road, London, E17 9BN. The deadline for submissions is ongoing, however for this leg of the exhibition artwork should be mailed through by May 25th 2011. The exhibition opens this Wednesday 18th January with my mail art work, and, as more mail art submissions come in, will be added to.

Read more about the world-wide cultural movement of Mail Art here.

*The reason I am exhibiting the first leg in E17 is because it’s a vibrant, art-filled community full of lovely people who are well into lovely things! Check out Stowscene to learn more about us.


Mail Art stamp and envelope with official Colt Anniversary postmark – Chuck Welch, aka Cracker Jack Kid, 1984